Behavioral Research Blog

Consumer behavior: do we enjoy the buffet to its fullest potential?

Posted by Annelies Verkerk on Mar 13, 2017

There are parts of the world where people eat primarily for pleasure, and less so to fulfil nutritional needs. In my eyes, that is a sign of prosperity and wealth. In these areas, there is more than enough to eat, and a wealth of different foods to choose from. But in these same parts of the world people are overweight, more and more diabetic, and suffering from cardiovascular diseases. So what is wealth, in terms of food? To address this, let’s zoom in on a consumer study that focuses on recognizing signs of fullness.

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Topics: The Observer XT, video observation, coding schemes, consumer behavior, consumer behavior research, video recording, Eating behavior, coding behavior, food, sensory science

Comparing two different skin-to-skin contact techniques

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Nov 23, 2016

And how they influence mother-child interaction with premature babies.

Three times I have experienced how it feels to hold my newborn baby in my arms. To feel that warm, small, naked body on top of you, the baby that is yours and grew inside you…that is probably the most precious gift I have ever experienced.
The little baby that just left the warm space it has spent all those months, and now exposed to the outside world - the only thing he or she needs is to feel safe with his or her mother or father.

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Topics: The Observer XT, video observation, parent-child interaction, eye-contact, kangaroo positioning, safety

The power of rejection (in fruit flies)

Posted by G. Smit, MSc & A.H. Macbeth, PhD on Sep 1, 2016

In a previous post we talked about fruit flies and their amazing sense of smell. This includes the ability to navigate to a food source, as well as search out a preferred mate. However, there are other areas in which their olfactory systems come into play. This includes courting behavior (did you know the male does all the work?) and obesity. Yes - obesity can be studied in fruit flies.

Image courtesy of Hans Smid, www.bugsinthepicture.com 
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Topics: Video tracking, video observation, drosophila, fruit fly

Video-recording children with ASD in-home

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Aug 8, 2016

Nowadays we often come across signs or printed versions of funny, motivational, and inspirational quotes about our homes. You’ll probably confirm this for yourself: we’ve all seen  a postcard, a doormat, or a picture in a magazine with sentences like: ‘Home is where the heart is’, ‘Home is where you can be yourself’ or ‘Home sweet home’. A funny one I like is ‘Home is where your Wi-Fi connects automatically’. We also read listings which convince us that ‘in this house we are real, we make mistakes, we say I’m sorry, we have fun, we forgive, we love’ and so on.

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Topics: The Observer XT, video observation, autism research, video recording, coding behavior, ASD, autism

Implementing Tailored Activity Programs

Posted by Julie Harrison on Aug 2, 2016

Sometimes pharmacological strategies can hurt more than they help. This is why non-pharmacological strategies are meant to be used as the first-line in the treatment of patients, but it can be difficult to tell which strategies should be used with dementia patients in hospitals.

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Topics: Alzheimer's disease, The Observer XT, video observation, doctor patient interaction, video recording, dementia, coding behavior

Let children design their own playground

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Jan 28, 2016

Getting outside, playing, and exercising is essential for healthy child development. It goes without saying that playing outside must be encouraged in children, especially when we realize that an estimated 80 percent of young children don’t exercise enough. The impact of playing outside on the social, motor and emotional development of children and their learning ability is immense. Therefore, it is of interest to researchers to answer the question: what makes the best playground, according to children?

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Topics: The Observer XT, video observation, behavioral research, motor development, child, child development, playing behavior

Mealtime difficulties can lead to bad nutrition in nursing homes

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Dec 8, 2015

I can hear you thinking already: ‘Another blog about food… it seems all they think and talk about at Noldus IT is having dinner!”.

And yes, indeed, research about the interactions that take place during mealtime has attracted my attention again. Not only because dinner is a daily reoccurring event, but also because food is important to our health; you are what you eat. This time, the research I am highlighting currently was carried out in adults with dementia, focusing on caregiver person-centeredness, and behavioral symptoms during mealtime interactions.

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Topics: The Observer XT, video observation, coding schemes, dementia, caregiver-resident interaction, person-centeredness

Consumer research – what determines food satisfaction?

Posted by Annelies Verkerk on Nov 17, 2015

My mother makes the best apple crumble. The top is crunchy, the apples warm and mushy (but not too mushy!), and the level of cinnamon is in perfect balance with the sugar and the apples. Honestly, I’ve never tasted a more delicious apple crumble, which  sets a high standard for friends or restaurants offering me an apple crumble dessert.

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Topics: video observation, Observation lab, media recorder, consumer behavior, consumer behavior research, Eating behavior, Observation

How to develop your training and education facility

Posted by Annelies Verkerk on Oct 19, 2015

Many professions, such as counselors, medical staff, and others, require you to have developed the necessary practical skills prior to starting the actual job. In educational or clinical psychology, for example, it is important to be able to observe interactions in a systematic way in order to be able to assess behavior. These skills are defined as core competencies for practitioner’s psychologist training.

Delaware Valley University - Counseling Psychology Master’s Program

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Topics: video observation, medical encounter, Observation lab, Viso, video feedback, video recording, counseling psychology

Information gap makes children guess

Posted by Annelies Verkerk on Aug 3, 2015

When children lack information, they make up stories by adding up their own guesses. Their imagination can run wild: all elephants are pink, right? This kind of reasoning is undesirable when trying to explain a rare disorder of a sister or brother. Guesswork may result in incorrect illness explanations and might cause related miscommunication or behavioral problems. When we learn more about how siblings describe illnesses, we might be able to appropriately assist family counselors and parents.

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Topics: The Observer XT, video observation, parent-child interaction, developmental psychology, conversation analysis

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