Behavioral Research Blog

Comparing two different skin-to-skin contact techniques

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Nov 23, 2016

And how they influence mother-child interaction with premature babies.

Three times I have experienced how it feels to hold my newborn baby in my arms. To feel that warm, small, naked body on top of you, the baby that is yours and grew inside you…that is probably the most precious gift I have ever experienced.
The little baby that just left the warm space it has spent all those months, and now exposed to the outside world - the only thing he or she needs is to feel safe with his or her mother or father.

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Topics: The Observer XT, video observation, parent-child interaction, eye-contact, kangaroo positioning, safety

Simulation-based training – it’s just like the real thing!

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Oct 25, 2016

A few weeks ago I posted a blog about observation and usability labs. But that isn’t the only way to observe in a laboratory setting – our systems are also well suited for use in simulation labs.

A simulation lab enables researchers to develop realistic scenarios to study a range of human-system interactions in a controlled environment. It provides a lifelike point-of-care learning experience for undergraduate and graduate students, specialists, and experts. By conducting training sessions, students in the lab develop and maintain knowledge, skills, and competencies such as interviewing skills, working with certain equipment, teamwork procedures, and so on.

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Topics: The Observer XT, simulation, Viso, medical simulation, simulation-based training, patient safety, quality of care, teamwork, skillstraining

A roundup of our best behavioral research posts of the summer

Posted by Natasja Bogers on Aug 31, 2016

With summer coming to an end it's time to gather the best of our behavioral research blog posts of the last couple of months. From research on the smell of fruit flies to in-home video recording studies and experiencing a conference for the first time: these articles should be on your reading list!

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Topics: The Observer XT, fruit fly, video recording, 2016, ASD

Video-recording children with ASD in-home

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Aug 8, 2016

Nowadays we often come across signs or printed versions of funny, motivational, and inspirational quotes about our homes. You’ll probably confirm this for yourself: we’ve all seen  a postcard, a doormat, or a picture in a magazine with sentences like: ‘Home is where the heart is’, ‘Home is where you can be yourself’ or ‘Home sweet home’. A funny one I like is ‘Home is where your Wi-Fi connects automatically’. We also read listings which convince us that ‘in this house we are real, we make mistakes, we say I’m sorry, we have fun, we forgive, we love’ and so on.

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Topics: The Observer XT, video observation, autism research, video recording, coding behavior, ASD, autism

Implementing Tailored Activity Programs

Posted by Julie Harrison on Aug 2, 2016

Sometimes pharmacological strategies can hurt more than they help. This is why non-pharmacological strategies are meant to be used as the first-line in the treatment of patients, but it can be difficult to tell which strategies should be used with dementia patients in hospitals.

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Topics: Alzheimer's disease, The Observer XT, video observation, doctor patient interaction, video recording, dementia, coding behavior

Students’ first contact with The Observer XT

Posted by Guest blogger on Jul 8, 2016

Systematic behavior research in farm animals has increasingly gained importance, especially during the last years.

Since the intensification of animal husbandry has substantially enhanced the discrepancy between natural and artificial environment, the following questions arise: What are the prerequisites for an animal to be able to show its full range of social behavior? How much space do animals require? What is the optimal group size?

The close monitoring of the social behavior of pigs, cattle, poultry and horses plays a major role in terms of welfare assessment and health research.

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Topics: The Observer XT, Precision farming, behavioral research, farm animals

How in-home video recordings provide accurate measure and allow for more objective comparisons

Posted by Annelies Verkerk on Jun 28, 2016

Who doesn’t know Jo Frost, A.K.A. the Super Nanny [1]? Her television show has aired across Europe, the UK and the US; currently, she  is starring in a Netherlands-based version, where she visits Dutch families. Although I don’t have any kids, I watch this show quite regularly with great interest to see how families function.

This super nanny keeps telling parents that children also have to eat healthy as part of her program to correct poor behavior. Many parents forget how proper nutrition can influence behavior. But many parents then ask: how do we get our kids to eat more fruits and vegetables?

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Topics: The Observer XT, parent-child interaction, Eating behavior, child, child development, health effects

The End of Sitting: a tool to prevent the negative effects of sitting

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Apr 25, 2016

What do you do when you want to think things over? In what position or environment are you when you get the best idea ever - in the shower, pacing up and down? Riding on your bike watching people go by, or enjoying the beautiful nature around you? Do you get in motion to organize your thoughts, or can you stay still sitting on a chair? And how does that affect your work habits? How do you stay active and productive?

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Topics: The Observer XT, video recording, sitting behavior, health effects, affordances

Understanding adolescent emotions

Posted by Annelies Verkerk on Apr 12, 2016

I was waiting for my exam results, and so was the son of our neighbors. And then there was a bang. A really loud one. I could guess the outcome of his exam simply by hearing that bang.

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Topics: The Observer XT, parent-child interaction, adolescent behavior, coding behavior, depression

Become and stay aware about children with autism

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Apr 6, 2016

Last week I had a chat with a friend of mine whose eldest son (8 years old) was diagnosed several years ago with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD). She told me about a conversation she and her husband had with a speech therapist, who explained to them that when someone asks their son a question or tells him something to do, it usually takes 7 seconds before his brain processed this information. Imagine that, 7 seconds – that’s quite a lot. In those 7 seconds many other words can be said or questions can be asked. But for this little boy it means that it is important to speak slowly and give one instruction at a time, or you will likely get little to no response, or only partial task completion.

Become and stay aware about children with autism

When there is a lack of understanding, you don’t realize that he needs this time to see the whole picture. When you have to deal with this over and over again, every single day, you can become very frustrated and annoyed by the child’s seeming failure to understand, or worse, lack of desire to listen.

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Topics: The Observer XT, autism research, parent-child interaction, child, social cognition, ASD, theatre, autism

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