Behavioral Research Blog

Why you should attend the BNA2017 Festival of Neuroscience in Birmingham, UK

Posted by Natasja Bogers on Feb 23, 2017

Whether you are a neuroscientist or working in the field of neuroscience, you have probably heard of the British Neuroscience Association. Their annual meeting is one of the largest neuroscience meetings in Europe this year - all the more reason not to miss out on attending!
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Topics: behavioral research, neuroscience, conferences, 2017

Best Reads of 2016

Posted by Natasja Bogers on Dec 30, 2016

As we're nearing the end of 2016 it's time to look back one more time. What did you read about most? These 10 blog posts that we wrote during the past year are the best read blog posts on the Behavioral Research Blog in 2016! 

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Topics: behavioral research, 2016

Looking back at some amazing events in 2016

Posted by Annelies Verkerk on Dec 27, 2016

The past year we’ve attended a lot of events, released many products, and worked together with great scientists. We look back at a fantastic year and will continue this positive flow in 2017.

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Topics: behavioral research, measuring behavior, conferences, 2016

Students’ first contact with The Observer XT

Posted by Guest blogger on Jul 8, 2016

Systematic behavior research in farm animals has increasingly gained importance, especially during the last years.

Since the intensification of animal husbandry has substantially enhanced the discrepancy between natural and artificial environment, the following questions arise: What are the prerequisites for an animal to be able to show its full range of social behavior? How much space do animals require? What is the optimal group size?

The close monitoring of the social behavior of pigs, cattle, poultry and horses plays a major role in terms of welfare assessment and health research.

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Topics: The Observer XT, Precision farming, behavioral research, farm animals

3 days of talking methods and techniques at Measuring Behavior 2016

Posted by Natasja Bogers on Jun 17, 2016

May 2016, Dublin - Early morning and the hotel lobby is already buzzing. Researchers from all over the world, members of the organizing committee, student volunteers, sales staff - all are gathering for the same purpose: the first day of Measuring Behavior 2016. At ten minutes to 9, the chatter slowly stops when Cathal Gurrin takes center stage. "Fáilte roimh a baile átha Cliath, welcome to Dublin!"

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Topics: animal behavior research, methods and techniques, human behavior research, behavioral research, measuring behavior, conferences, 2016, lifelogging

Why measuring behavior is awesome (+3 examples to prove it)

Posted by Natasja Bogers on Apr 28, 2016

Behavior is a general and universal thing. To state it simply: behavior is the way a person or animal acts in a particular situation/environment. As ways to behave are numerous and we are a curious species, people have been measuring behavior for centuries now. So, why is measuring behavior awesome? These 3 examples prove it.

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Topics: behavioral research, measuring behavior, conferences

Let children design their own playground

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Jan 28, 2016

Getting outside, playing, and exercising is essential for healthy child development. It goes without saying that playing outside must be encouraged in children, especially when we realize that an estimated 80 percent of young children don’t exercise enough. The impact of playing outside on the social, motor and emotional development of children and their learning ability is immense. Therefore, it is of interest to researchers to answer the question: what makes the best playground, according to children?

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Topics: The Observer XT, video observation, behavioral research, motor development, child, child development, playing behavior

10 reasons why you should attend Measuring Behavior 2016

Posted by Natasja Bogers on Dec 9, 2015

Every two years, the international multi-disciplinary conference Measuring Behavior is organized and held in Europe. If you are a behavioral researcher, you really shouldn’t miss it. Why?

Here are 10 reasons why you should attend Measuring Behavior 2016!

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Topics: animal behavior research, methods and techniques, human behavior research, behavioral research, measuring behavior, conferences

5 reasons why you should go to Measuring Behavior 2014

Posted by Andrew Spink on Jul 14, 2014

Measuring Behavior is an international multidisciplinary conference which takes place every two years. This August it is in Wageningen, in the Netherlands. If you are a behavioral researcher, you really ought to attend. Why?

1.    The diverse, multidisciplinary program. The scientific program contains contributions focusing on purely scientific aspects (issues of replicability, dynamic aspects of behavior) and applied research (animal welfare), human behavior (eye trackers in consumer research) and animal (rodent behavior), technical sessions (video tracking of social animals and recognition of human behaviors from video), sessions presenting the latest technology (3D simulators) and topics that are of relevance to everyone (eating behavior of people). The above list just scratches the surface of what promises to be a very diverse and interesting three days.

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Topics: animal behavior research, emotion recognition, animal welfare, methods and techniques, Automating behavioral observations, human behavior research, consumer behavior, behavioral research, measuring behavior, conferences

Interspecific aggression: spotted dolphins vs. bottlenose dolphins

Posted by Julie Harrison on Jun 30, 2014

In the animal kingdom, competition is a part of life. Dominance hierarchies are common both within a group in a species (intergroup) or between two different species (interspecific). These hierarchies often result in aggression as the groups fight for dominance. It would make sense, therefore, that two species who are similar in status in the dominance hierarchy would have an unstable relationship and therefore engage in interspecific aggression continuously over time. One example of two species consistently engaging in interspecific aggression to establish dominance would be the Atlantic spotted dolphins (Stenella frontalis) and Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

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Topics: The Observer XT, behavioral research, dolphin

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