Behavioral Research Blog

Effectiveness of video feedback in education

Posted by Annelies Verkerk on Mar 1, 2017

Did you know that…

1. Did you know that…Many students experience stress when they have to participate in video feedback sessions, and some are even reluctant to participate? 

  • Two Norwegian researchers, Nilsen and Baerheim, found that some students experienced emotional distress before the start of the course. Their study shows the importance of reassurance and support in the process, and demonstrates the importance of carefully considering the design and execution of such educational programs.
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Topics: The Observer XT, Educational research, coding schemes, behavioral patterns, healthcare, Viso, video feedback, measuring behavior, coding behavior, healthcare education, teamwork

Mice with spatial and odor memory impairment – new model for sporadic Alzheimer’s

Posted by G. Smit on Feb 27, 2017

Plaques and tangles… those of you even remotely familiar with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) will immediately recognize these hallmarks. Many rodent models, focusing on plaques and tangles, have been developed to explore the cause and possible treatments of AD, and much progress has been made.

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Topics: EthoVision XT, mice, Video tracking, learning and memory, olfactory memory

Why you should attend the BNA2017 Festival of Neuroscience in Birmingham, UK

Posted by Natasja Bogers on Feb 23, 2017

Whether you are a neuroscientist or working in the field of neuroscience, you have probably heard of the British Neuroscience Association. Their annual meeting is one of the largest neuroscience meetings in Europe this year - all the more reason not to miss out on attending!
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Topics: behavioral research, neuroscience, conferences, 2017

Video Recording used in Psychology

Posted by Annelies Verkerk on Feb 20, 2017

Much of psychology education deals with the challenge of how to effectively teach and evaluate skills professionals need in certain interactions. For example, think about conversational skills psychologists need in interactions such as a parent-child interaction, group discussion, or an individual counseling meeting. In these cases, the feedback given by the expert to the student is of crucial importance. However, having a teacher sit in on the interaction might have an unwanted effect on the situation at hand. What can we do to improve the learning experience of the student and make the process run as smoothly as possible for the teacher?

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Topics: Educational research, Viso, audio recording, video feedback, video recording, healthcare education

The Ultimate List of (Behavioral) Neuroscience Conferences in 2017

Posted by Natasja Bogers on Feb 17, 2017

Every year thousands of scientific meetings, events, and conferences are organized worldwide. While the academic world is constantly developing, attending conferences is a great way to stay up-to-date and in touch with the latest innovations and your fellow-peers. To make things easy for you we've sorted out some of the best (behavioral) neuroscience conferences in 2017 to attend.

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Topics: neuroscience, conferences, 2017

To be ravenous or to be social

Posted by Olga Krips on Feb 15, 2017

To voluntarily benefit another

Prosocial behavior, a voluntary behavior to benefit another, is an interesting concept from an evolutionary point of view. At first sight it may seem logical to be social, because everyone in the group benefits from it. But evolutionarily that does not hold up, because to propagate one’s own genes, cheating and being selfish pays. Therefore, many believe that prosocial behavior only exists because it is rewarded with social status, reputation, company, and receiving social behavior from others in return.  [1]

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Topics: The Observer XT, coding schemes, birds, coding behavior, food

Helping children cope with social anxiety

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Feb 9, 2017

Now and then, we all feel afraid to some extent. For example, imagine when thunder nearby strikes hard, or when you’re in a dark, small room and you don’t know how to get out, or when you think you’ve gotten lost.

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Topics: The Observer XT, anxiety research, child development, social anxiety, Theory of Mind, shyness

Free-choice digital interactive enrichment and human-animal interaction

Posted by Guest blogger on Feb 6, 2017

Read this guest blog post about an Australian National University PhD research at the Seoul Zoo by Nicky Kim-McCormack and colleagues. 

Measuring changes in captive great ape welfare and conservation attitudes

 

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Topics: The Observer XT, animal-human interaction, animal welfare, media recorder, apes, visitor response, IP Cameras

How obese mice get moving

Posted by G. Smit on Jan 26, 2017

By a showing of hands:  how many of you started this New Year with the resolution to get moving? Burn off those extra holiday calories, or finally really get in shape? Because, let’s be honest, it’s all about willpower right? “Just do it!”

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Topics: EthoVision XT, mice, obesitas, behavior recognition

Attention! Drive safely

Posted by Guest blogger on Jan 24, 2017

This blog post is a guest post by Katja Kircher from VTI, the Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute. In a recent study with bicyclists, researchers at VTI observed cyclist behavior using eye tracking technology, video recordings, and behavioral coding. All data combined enabled them to assess whether the cyclists met the demands in specific situations. Did receiving a text message influence the cyclist’s behavior, particularly in high-attention demanding circumstances? Read the blog post to learn more!

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Topics: The Observer XT, eye tracking, Eye tracker, driver behavior, data integration

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