Behavioral Research Blog

The Ultimate List of (Behavioral) Neuroscience Conferences in 2017

Posted by Natasja Bogers on Feb 17, 2017

Every year thousands of scientific meetings, events, and conferences are organized worldwide. While the academic world is constantly developing, attending conferences is a great way to stay up-to-date and in touch with the latest innovations and your fellow-peers. To make things easy for you we've sorted out some of the best (behavioral) neuroscience conferences in 2017 to attend.

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Topics: neuroscience, conferences, 2017

To be ravenous or to be social

Posted by Olga Krips on Feb 15, 2017

To voluntarily benefit another

Prosocial behavior, a voluntary behavior to benefit another, is an interesting concept from an evolutionary point of view. At first sight it may seem logical to be social, because everyone in the group benefits from it. But evolutionarily that does not hold up, because to propagate one’s own genes, cheating and being selfish pays. Therefore, many believe that prosocial behavior only exists because it is rewarded with social status, reputation, company, and receiving social behavior from others in return.  [1]

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Topics: The Observer XT, coding schemes, birds, coding behavior, food

Helping children cope with social anxiety

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Feb 9, 2017

Now and then, we all feel afraid to some extent. For example, imagine when thunder nearby strikes hard, or when you’re in a dark, small room and you don’t know how to get out, or when you think you’ve gotten lost.

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Topics: The Observer XT, anxiety research, child development, social anxiety, Theory of Mind, shyness

Free-choice digital interactive enrichment and human-animal interaction

Posted by Guest blogger on Feb 6, 2017

Read this guest blog post about an Australian National University PhD research at the Seoul Zoo by Nicky Kim-McCormack and colleagues. 

Measuring changes in captive great ape welfare and conservation attitudes

 

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Topics: The Observer XT, animal-human interaction, animal welfare, media recorder, apes, visitor response, IP Cameras

How obese mice get moving

Posted by G. Smit on Jan 26, 2017

By a showing of hands:  how many of you started this New Year with the resolution to get moving? Burn off those extra holiday calories, or finally really get in shape? Because, let’s be honest, it’s all about willpower right? “Just do it!”

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Topics: EthoVision XT, mice, obesitas, behavior recognition

Attention! Drive safely

Posted by Guest blogger on Jan 24, 2017

This blog post is a guest post by Katja Kircher from VTI, the Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute. In a recent study with bicyclists, researchers at VTI observed cyclist behavior using eye tracking technology, video recordings, and behavioral coding. All data combined enabled them to assess whether the cyclists met the demands in specific situations. Did receiving a text message influence the cyclist’s behavior, particularly in high-attention demanding circumstances? Read the blog post to learn more!

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Topics: The Observer XT, eye tracking, Eye tracker, driver behavior, data integration

How optogenetics is used to study the stress response in zebrafish larvae

Posted by G. Smit on Jan 23, 2017

Optogenetics - making neurons sensitive to activation by light - is a great tool in the unraveling of the function of the brain in biological processes and behavior. In a recent study by Rodrigo J. De Marco and his colleagues used optogenetic techniques to uncover the role of the pituitary in zebrafish larvae behavior after the onset of stress.

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Topics: EthoVision XT, zebrafish, optogenetics, stress research

Autistic mice have motor learning difficulties specific to the cerebellum

Posted by G. Smit on Jan 13, 2017

Most of us are familiar with the typical behavioral characteristics associated with autism: social behavior deficits and repetitive behaviors. However, motor abnormalities are also a part of the autism behavioral spectrum. These have generally been linked to malfunction of the cerebral cortex, but recent studies have also implicated the cerebellum.

Autistic phenotype in mice

Shank2 is a gene that encodes a postsynaptic protein and has been linked to autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In short, inactivation of this gene in mice creates “autistic mice” (Won et al. Nature 2012).

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Topics: mice, autism research, ErasmusLadder, cerebellum, autism

Best Reads of 2016

Posted by Natasja Bogers on Dec 30, 2016

As we're nearing the end of 2016 it's time to look back one more time. What did you read about most? These 10 blog posts that we wrote during the past year are the best read blog posts on the Behavioral Research Blog in 2016! 

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Topics: behavioral research, 2016

Looking back at some amazing events in 2016

Posted by Annelies Verkerk on Dec 27, 2016

The past year we’ve attended a lot of events, released many products, and worked together with great scientists. We look back at a fantastic year and will continue this positive flow in 2017.

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Topics: behavioral research, measuring behavior, conferences, 2016

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