Behavioral Research Blog

Linda Hoekstra

Recent Posts

How to measure a zebrafish larva’s highly stereotyped response to water motion?

Posted by Linda Hoekstra on Jul 9, 2015

At the Max Planck Institute in Germany, Groneberg and colleagues researched one of the neural bases for behavior in Danio rerio. They showed that larval zebrafish execute approach reactions followed by a form of positive taxis and gradual motion damping in response to water flows. That might sound complicated, but what it basically means is that zebrafish larvae are able to detect minute movement in the water and respond in a stereotypical way.

Read More

Topics: EthoVision XT, Video tracking, zebrafish, Danio rerio, stereotypies

A new method to evaluate if dogs are suitable for IED bomb detection

Posted by Linda Hoekstra on May 7, 2015

Military dogs, especially improvised explosive device (IED)-detection dogs, work in war zones under harsh conditions. Being attuned to fear-inducing sounds and recovering quickly is a critical requirement. Margaret Gruen and her colleagues recently investigated a new method to assess sound induced fear and anxiety in candidate IED-detection dogs – specifically, Labrador retrievers.  

Read More

Topics: EthoVision XT, dogs, open field test, anxiety research, physiology, fear research

Which head and neck positions are stressful for your horse during lunging?

Posted by Linda Hoekstra on Apr 17, 2015

Being a horse owner and a Noldus employee is the perfect combination when it comes to keeping track of the scientific background for my horseback riding hobby. Since horses communicate differently than humans, I always wonder if I have a “happy athlete” when we are exercising together. Esmee Smiet and colleagues recently investigated the effects of different head and neck positions (HNPs) on behavior, heart rate variability (HRV) and cortisol levels in lunged Royal Dutch Sport horses. Interestingly, they were able to find significant differences in stress response between different head and neck positions, suggesting that there are indeed low stress and high stress ways to exercise your horse.  

Read More

Topics: The Observer XT, horses, physiology, stress research

Subscribe to Email Updates

Posts by Topic

see all