Behavioral Research Blog

Jacqueline Martinali

Recent Posts

Helping children cope with social anxiety

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Feb 9, 2017

Now and then, we all feel afraid to some extent. For example, imagine when thunder nearby strikes hard, or when you’re in a dark, small room and you don’t know how to get out, or when you think you’ve gotten lost.

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Topics: The Observer XT, anxiety research, child development, social anxiety, Theory of Mind, shyness

Comparing two different skin-to-skin contact techniques

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Nov 23, 2016

And how they influence mother-child interaction with premature babies.

Three times I have experienced how it feels to hold my newborn baby in my arms. To feel that warm, small, naked body on top of you, the baby that is yours and grew inside you…that is probably the most precious gift I have ever experienced.
The little baby that just left the warm space it has spent all those months, and now exposed to the outside world - the only thing he or she needs is to feel safe with his or her mother or father.

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Topics: The Observer XT, video observation, parent-child interaction, eye-contact, kangaroo positioning, safety

Simulation-based training – it’s just like the real thing!

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Oct 25, 2016

A few weeks ago I posted a blog about observation and usability labs. But that isn’t the only way to observe in a laboratory setting – our systems are also well suited for use in simulation labs.

A simulation lab enables researchers to develop realistic scenarios to study a range of human-system interactions in a controlled environment. It provides a lifelike point-of-care learning experience for undergraduate and graduate students, specialists, and experts. By conducting training sessions, students in the lab develop and maintain knowledge, skills, and competencies such as interviewing skills, working with certain equipment, teamwork procedures, and so on.

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Topics: The Observer XT, simulation, Viso, medical simulation, simulation-based training, patient safety, quality of care, teamwork, skillstraining

Learn about people by observing them

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Oct 3, 2016

Everyone is unique; everyone behaves differently. What is more fun than sitting somewhere - on a park bench, at a cafe, or on a terrace, and watching people go by? Postures, movements, nonverbal and verbal behavior - all can be observed.

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Topics: Observation lab, usability lab, psychology, ux lab, Observational research, controlled observations, usability testing

Video-recording children with ASD in-home

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Aug 8, 2016

Nowadays we often come across signs or printed versions of funny, motivational, and inspirational quotes about our homes. You’ll probably confirm this for yourself: we’ve all seen  a postcard, a doormat, or a picture in a magazine with sentences like: ‘Home is where the heart is’, ‘Home is where you can be yourself’ or ‘Home sweet home’. A funny one I like is ‘Home is where your Wi-Fi connects automatically’. We also read listings which convince us that ‘in this house we are real, we make mistakes, we say I’m sorry, we have fun, we forgive, we love’ and so on.

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Topics: The Observer XT, video observation, autism research, video recording, coding behavior, ASD, autism

Experiencing Measuring Behavior

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Jun 22, 2016

Coming back from my first Measuring Behavior (MB) conference, a number of colleagues asked me how it was - did I enjoy myself, and would I write  a blog about it? So here I am, overwhelmed by all the information I received during my two days at the conference, but clueless as to what to write about my experience. Where do I start, which things would I like to highlight, and what struck me the most?

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Topics: FaceReader, tracking, human behavior research, measuring behavior, conferences, lifelogging, non-intrusive measurements

Mirror, mirror on the wall

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on May 19, 2016

It’s Friday the 13th. Together with my colleague Sandra, we took a walk around Amsterdam’s Java Island. All around us we read slogans like ‘the future has arrived’, ‘drinking water is getting scarcer’ and ‘how do we use and abuse data?’ Already a special feeling is coming over me. The future has arrived on Friday the 13th? What does that mean for our visit here in Amsterdam?
Between all the pavilions, installations, and prototypes about the future of everyday living, we easily found what we were looking for: the We Are Data - mirror room.

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Topics: emotion recognition, FaceReader, facial expression recognition software, mirror room, remote photo-plethysmography

The End of Sitting: a tool to prevent the negative effects of sitting

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Apr 25, 2016

What do you do when you want to think things over? In what position or environment are you when you get the best idea ever - in the shower, pacing up and down? Riding on your bike watching people go by, or enjoying the beautiful nature around you? Do you get in motion to organize your thoughts, or can you stay still sitting on a chair? And how does that affect your work habits? How do you stay active and productive?

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Topics: The Observer XT, video recording, sitting behavior, health effects, affordances

Become and stay aware about children with autism

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Apr 6, 2016

Last week I had a chat with a friend of mine whose eldest son (8 years old) was diagnosed several years ago with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD). She told me about a conversation she and her husband had with a speech therapist, who explained to them that when someone asks their son a question or tells him something to do, it usually takes 7 seconds before his brain processed this information. Imagine that, 7 seconds – that’s quite a lot. In those 7 seconds many other words can be said or questions can be asked. But for this little boy it means that it is important to speak slowly and give one instruction at a time, or you will likely get little to no response, or only partial task completion.

Become and stay aware about children with autism

When there is a lack of understanding, you don’t realize that he needs this time to see the whole picture. When you have to deal with this over and over again, every single day, you can become very frustrated and annoyed by the child’s seeming failure to understand, or worse, lack of desire to listen.

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Topics: The Observer XT, autism research, parent-child interaction, child, social cognition, ASD, theatre, autism

What if you saw a gigantic wave take away your safe harbor?

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Mar 10, 2016

Losing a close family member, seeing a dead body, being separated from your loved ones, witnessing gigantic waves: these are all traumatic events no one wants to be exposed to. Individuals who witnessed the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake faced at least one, and often more, of these events. Going through such a trauma can result in onset of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

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Topics: FaceReader, facial expression analysis, child, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, emotional numbing, facial expression recognition software, PTSD, trauma

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