Behavioral Research Blog

Four cool cow facts

Posted by Annelies Verkerk on Nov 26, 2015, 2:56 PM

The investigation of movement, activity, and behavior of animals in pens or stables gives great insight into differences between group and individual housing, enriched and plain stables, different types of feeding systems, and so on. Read this blog to learn more about that, but also about cow behavior in paddocks.

Read More

Topics: GPS, Precision farming, TrackLab, Cows, tracking

Does pesticide resistance make malaria mosquitoes “smarter”?

Posted by Olga Krips on Nov 19, 2015, 12:00 AM

In one of my previous blog posts, I wrote about the success of insecticide treated bed nets (ITNs) in preventing malaria. In the past five years, mortality from malaria has dropped with 60%, which is at least partly due to the widespread use of ITNs [1]. However, ITNs do not offer a 100% effective solution against malaria, primarily due to the fact that not everyone in malaria-affected areas has access to ITNs. But even if they did, malaria-spreading mosquitoes may still be able to bite their victims if the bed nets have holes. In addition, mosquitoes may develop resistance against the insecticides the bed nets are treated with.

By James D. Gathany (The Public Health Image Library , ID#444) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Read More

Topics: EthoVision XT, Video tracking, Mosquito

Consumer research – what determines food satisfaction?

Posted by Annelies Verkerk on Nov 17, 2015, 9:25 AM

My mother makes the best apple crumble. The top is crunchy, the apples warm and mushy (but not too mushy!), and the level of cinnamon is in perfect balance with the sugar and the apples. Honestly, I’ve never tasted a more delicious apple crumble, which  sets a high standard for friends or restaurants offering me an apple crumble dessert.

Read More

Topics: video observation, Observation lab, media recorder, consumer behavior, consumer behavior research, Eating behavior, Observation

Beating diabetes - knowledge is the key

Posted by Annelies Verkerk on Nov 9, 2015, 1:32 PM

The World Diabetes Day 2015 campaign was officially launched during the World Health Assembly in Geneva last May. World Diabetes Day 2015, 14 November, focuses on healthy eating.

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) will release the Diabetes Atlas Seventh Edition on Thursday 12 November. Find out more about diabetes in 2015 at

Read More

Topics: Diabetes, healthcare, Eating behavior

Positive Behavior Support: Good behavior can be learned

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Nov 4, 2015, 10:14 AM

‘Mom, what's for dinner tonight?’ It’s a daily recurring question from my children. Having dinner is an important part of the day and also a way for parents or caregivers to influence a child's diet. With the observed increase in pediatric obesity in recent years, a child’s family, particularly his parents, may influence eating behavior, diet, and physical activity through their parenting and food choices. Some factors that affect eating behavior can be: what and how much food do parents serve their children? To what extent do they encourage their children to eat healthy food instead of unhealthy food? It’s important to raise awareness amongst parents of young children of the consequences of unhealthy eating habits, and teach them to create a healthy nutritional environment for their children.

Read More

Topics: The Observer XT, parent-child interaction, Eating behavior, Observation, Positive Behavior Support

Neuroscience 2015 – looking back

Posted by G. Smit on Oct 29, 2015, 1:08 PM

About a week ago I was on a plane flying back from Chicago to Amsterdam. I was exhausted, but very pleased with my experiences at my first Neuroscience meeting. I started out taking baby steps on my first day, but soon I was running a marathon (well, sort of). By Tuesday I really started feeling ‘at home’ and finally it even felt a bit sad to break down the booth and put everything back into the big crates for next year’s show. 

Read More

Topics: EthoVision XT, animal behavior research, neuroscience

Neuroscience 2015 – Saying goodbye

Posted by G. Smit on Oct 22, 2015, 4:35 PM

Wednesday, October 21st – I have been talking to so many interesting people around here. Not just researchers, but other vendors as well, such as our partner company Inscopix. It was great meeting some of the people from the company that made an important contribution to the research presented at our satellite symposium on Monday. I think there is a bright future ahead in combining live brain imaging with video tracking technology and I hope to be reporting about it more in the near future.

Read More

Topics: mice, Alzheimer's disease, zebrafish, Danio rerio, home cage, PhenoTyper, 2015, conferences, SfN

Neuroscience 2015 – Getting into the flow of things

Posted by G. Smit on Oct 21, 2015, 5:15 PM

Tuesday, October 20th – I never thought I would be saying this by day three, but I am actually kind of getting used to how this works. I am absorbing all of the information like a sponge and it is apparently quite a big sponge, because I am ready to absorb more!

Read More

Topics: EthoVision XT, Danio rerio, optogenetics, PhenoTyper, 2015, neuroscience

Neuroscience 2015 – Running a marathon

Posted by G. Smit on Oct 20, 2015, 9:33 PM

Monday, October 19th - After my “baby steps” at my first Neuroscience meeting on Sunday, it was time for some running action. Well, honestly, I wasn’t really running around, but I do feel like I walked a marathon. I was set on seeing all the posters today; with two sessions a day, I walked down all those aisles twice. (Can you tell I am kind of proud of myself? I am totally doing this again tomorrow).

Read More

Topics: EthoVision XT, optogenetics, 2015, neuroscience, conferences, SfN

Neuroscience 2015 – Baby steps

Posted by G. Smit on Oct 19, 2015, 4:34 PM

Sunday, October 18th - After helping out my colleagues set up the booth on Saturday, Sunday was my first ‘actual’ SfN day. As a first-timer, I tried to prepare for Neuroscience 2015, but quickly found that you really cannot. It is overwhelming – in a good way. It is like a playground for scientists and anyone interested in what goes on in the brain. And even though there are enough people here to fill a city, it feels like a welcoming community.

Spending the energy

There is so much going on, that it’s hard to decide what booth to see, which lecture to go to, or which poster to visit.

Read More

Topics: EthoVision XT, Danio rerio, DanioVision, CatWalk XT, PhenoTyper, ErasmusLadder, automated tube test, 2015, neuroscience

Subscribe to Email Updates

Posts by Topic

see all