Behavioral Research Blog

3 reasons to join us at the AHFE meeting in Florida

Posted by Annelies Verkerk on Jul 21, 2016

Next week the 7th International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics will kick off. It is always great to use the summer season to meet other researchers, walk along the poster boards, discuss and exchange ideas about new applications, and view the latest tools and solutions for research. AHFE facilitates it all: keynote presentation, parallel sessions, demonstration and poster sessions, tutorials, exhibitions, and meetings of special interest groups.

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Topics: human factors, conferences, driver behavior, drivelab

Students’ first contact with The Observer XT

Posted by Guest blogger on Jul 8, 2016

Systematic behavior research in farm animals has increasingly gained importance, especially during the last years.

Since the intensification of animal husbandry has substantially enhanced the discrepancy between natural and artificial environment, the following questions arise: What are the prerequisites for an animal to be able to show its full range of social behavior? How much space do animals require? What is the optimal group size?

The close monitoring of the social behavior of pigs, cattle, poultry and horses plays a major role in terms of welfare assessment and health research.

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Topics: The Observer XT, Precision farming, behavioral research, farm animals

Best consumer behavior conferences to attend in 2016

Posted by Natasja Bogers on Jun 30, 2016

Every year thousands of meetings and conferences are organized worldwide. Needless to say it’s easy to overlook the best conferences you should attend. To make things easy for you we've sorted out some of the best consumer behavior conferences to attend this year.

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Topics: consumer behavior, consumer behavior research, conferences, 2016

How in-home video recordings provide accurate measure and allow for more objective comparisons

Posted by Annelies Verkerk on Jun 28, 2016

Who doesn’t know Jo Frost, A.K.A. the Super Nanny [1]? Her television show has aired across Europe, the UK and the US; currently, she  is starring in a Netherlands-based version, where she visits Dutch families. Although I don’t have any kids, I watch this show quite regularly with great interest to see how families function.

This super nanny keeps telling parents that children also have to eat healthy as part of her program to correct poor behavior. Many parents forget how proper nutrition can influence behavior. But many parents then ask: how do we get our kids to eat more fruits and vegetables?

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Topics: The Observer XT, parent-child interaction, Eating behavior, child, child development, health effects

Experiencing Measuring Behavior

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on Jun 22, 2016

Coming back from my first Measuring Behavior (MB) conference, a number of colleagues asked me how it was - did I enjoy myself, and would I write  a blog about it? So here I am, overwhelmed by all the information I received during my two days at the conference, but clueless as to what to write about my experience. Where do I start, which things would I like to highlight, and what struck me the most?

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Topics: FaceReader, tracking, human behavior research, measuring behavior, conferences, lifelogging, non-intrusive measurements

3 days of talking methods and techniques at Measuring Behavior 2016

Posted by Natasja Bogers on Jun 17, 2016

May 2016, Dublin - Early morning and the hotel lobby is already buzzing. Researchers from all over the world, members of the organizing committee, student volunteers, sales staff - all are gathering for the same purpose: the first day of Measuring Behavior 2016. At ten minutes to 9, the chatter slowly stops when Cathal Gurrin takes center stage. "Fáilte roimh a baile átha Cliath, welcome to Dublin!"

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Topics: methods and techniques, measuring behavior, conferences, 2016

Mirror, mirror on the wall

Posted by Jacqueline Martinali on May 19, 2016

It’s Friday the 13th. Together with my colleague Sandra, we took a walk around Amsterdam’s Java Island. All around us we read slogans like ‘the future has arrived’, ‘drinking water is getting scarcer’ and ‘how do we use and abuse data?’ Already a special feeling is coming over me. The future has arrived on Friday the 13th? What does that mean for our visit here in Amsterdam?
Between all the pavilions, installations, and prototypes about the future of everyday living, we easily found what we were looking for: the We Are Data - mirror room.

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Topics: emotion recognition, FaceReader, facial expression recognition software, mirror room, remote photo-plethysmography

How to use CatWalk XT and Incapacitance Tester in non-clinical pain research

Posted by Guest blogger on May 13, 2016

Today we have another guest blog post for you! Heta Svard from Orion Pharma studies pain and neurological disorders and will be presenting a poster on a recent study at Measuring Behavior 2016 in Dublin this month! I encourage you to pay her a visit (poster no. 39), but for now, you can read about her study in this post. Thanks, Heta! 

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Topics: CatWalk XT, inflammatory joint pain, analgesic research

How sleep heals the brain

Posted by G. Smit on May 10, 2016


rearing-brow-rat-500.jpgWe sleep a large portion of our lives. We need to, we know this, and science proves it. Sleep helps us to process what we have learned, to let our nervous system function properly, and to concentrate during the day. We have all been there: a bit of stress or anxiety for a big day coming up leads to not sleeping well, and we suffer the consequences. Loss of concentration, maybe a bit cranky… my mother always told me sleep makes everything better. And now researchers have proven that it can heal the brain. The question is, how?

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Topics: EthoVision XT, learning and memory, rats, novel object test, traumatic brain injury, sleep research

The bat - moth aerial battle in 3D

Posted by Fabrizio Grieco on May 5, 2016

Any insect that flies at night must deal with bat predation. Take a moth, for example. Moths arrived first on the evolutionary stage; when much later on bats appeared with their sophisticated apparatus for echolocating prey, moths were forced to change or die. Some species developed ears to hear the approach of a bat; this generally evokes evasive flight maneuvers like loops and dives. Other species acquired distasteful chemicals that gave them a repugnant or poisonous taste. Some even developed the ability to produce sounds that seem to confuse, and sometimes thwart, an attacking bat.

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Topics: EthoVision XT, media recorder, Track3D, moths, bats

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